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Spring Framework 4.1: General Availability Release

Spring was able to stay on schedule, seven months after they publicized their plan, Spring Framework 4.1 General Availability (GA) has been released and is now accessible. The GA announcement has been made by Juergen Hoeller, co-founder of Spring Framework, in Spring’s blog site last September 4.

Spring Framework 4.1, started its development in January 2014 and had its first release candidate in July followed up by a second release candidate last August 15 which includes fixes and improvements. According to Hoeller, the following are the new features being offered in 4.1:

Modular Source Code for JDK 9

Modular Source Code also known as JEP 201, authored by Mark Reinhold and owned by Alan Bateman was created on July 22, 2014. JEP 201, second among the JEPs lined up for JDK 9, will “restructure the JDK’s source code from a scheme used since 1997 into modules, improve the build system to compile modules, and implement module boundaries at build time”. However, JRE and JDK binary images will stay as they are and no module system will be introduced.

JEP 201 is described as a part of the first phase of JDK 9’s main feature – Project Jigsaw. One main goal of the Project Jigsaw is to “make implementations of the Java SE Platform easily scalable down to small devices”. In connection with Project Jigsaw’s development, it was mentioned by Reinhold in one of his previous blog posts that merging is advisable to be performed before Jigsaw nears its completion.

In a short message posted by Reinhold last August 18, 2014, entitled “JDK 9’s source code is now modular”, he announced that JEP 201 changesets have been merged into the JDK. The changes are now included in the latest Early Access Release for JDK 9 – 9 Build b29 which is now available for download.

Restructuring the source code at an early stage is driven by the following factors:

1. JDK developers will have a chance to familiarize themselves with the “modular structure of the system”;
2. Implementation of “module boundaries in the build” to maintain that structure moving forward;
3. “Shuffling” of non-modular source code to modular will be prevented during the improvements on Project Jigsaw.

Java EE 8: Beginning of Journey

Last week, Oracle announced on their blog site the official launching of the newest version of Java Platform, Enterprise EditionJava EE 8. The Java EE 8 also known as JSR 366 was started through the Java Community Process (JCP). The primary focus of improvements for the Java EE platform are enumerated below, details are posted on JCP website:

    Web Standards – support for HTML 5 and HTTP 2.0
    Ease of development – using CDI to improve managed bean model
    Cloud Support – enhancement of Java EE 7’s cloud support infrastructure
    Java SE 8 – use of Java SE 8 to build Java EE 8 and benefit from its features such as “repeating annotations, lambda expressions, the Date/Time API, type annotations, Completable Futures, etc.”

The following JSRs are proposed initial contents for the Java EE 8 Platform:

    Java API for JSON Binding (JSR-367) – defined as “standard binding layer (metadata & runtime) for converting Java objects to/from JSON messages”.Schedule of Final Release: Third Quarter of 2016.
    JCache (JSR-107) – “standardize in process caching of Java objects”. Final release date: March 18, 2014.

A number of additional APIs were also submitted for possible inclusion in the Java EE 8:

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